Carl Goldman, the owner of a radio station in California, has spoken about his experience catching caronavirus on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Tokyo and then relishing some time away from his wife in a biocontainment unit

    Medical staff wear protective gear at The Quinquinie Hospital in Douala, Cameroon (Image: REUTERS)

    A man who is quarantined on a cruise ship and has coronavirus has said it is not "that bad".

    The bold assertion was made by Carl Goldman, who caught the disease while on the Diamond Princess which is currently docked off Japan.

    The 60-year-old left the ship at the end of a 16-day cruise two weeks ago, underwent tests and then boarded a bus to the airport.

    Along with his wife, Carl was put on a US Government plane and flown to Travis Air Force base in California, he told the Washington Post.

    It was only once he arrived in an area cordoned off with sheets of plastic that his burning hot 103C temperature came to light.

    Hundreds of passengers on the Diamond Princess cruise ship have coronavirus
    (Image: AFP via Getty Images)

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    Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention then took the couple to a quarantine location at the University of Nebraska hospital on February 17.

    There the KHTS radio owner from Santa Claita, California was wheeled on a stretcher to a biocontainment unit where he was securely locked away from the outside world.

    With world class doctors monitoring his vital signs and feeding him vitamins and minerals through a drip, Carl had time to reflect on the disease, which he said was less severe than a bout of bronchitis he previously suffered.

    Carl was taken off the Diamond Princess and taken back to the US
    (Image: REUTERS)

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    "This has been much easier: no chills, no body aches, I breathe easily, and I don’t have a stuffy nose," he told the Washington Post.

    "My chest feels tight, and I have coughing spells. If I were at home with similar symptoms, I probably would have gone to work as usual."

    Carl was quick to find some positives in his situation.

    Countries including the US and the Philippines took citizens off the ship
    (Image: DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX)

    As well as spending his ten days in the biocontainment unit catching up with some work on his laptop, he relished some time away from his wife, who tested negative and was quarantined elsewhere.

    While he still tested positive for the disease, he does not "require much medical care" and will be released when he passes three tests in a row.

    Carl recommended that people worried about coronavirus acquire a digital thermometer to put their mind at ease if their nose begins to run.

    "Coronavirus doesn’t  have  to be a horrible calamity," he concluded.

    Buses believed to be carryinmg the U.S. passengers of the cruise ship
    (Image: REUTERS)

    Yesterday the first US death from coronavirus was confirmed.

    The disease, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, has so far killed more than 2,800 people – and infected over 80,000 worldwide.

    Washington state health officials reported the first patient death from coronavirus in the United States today.

    In a press conference, Donald Trump said the victim was a woman in her 50s.

    However, it turned out that the person who died was actually a man, Washington state governor Jay Inslee said.

    A senior administration official later blamed the mix-up on  Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    They claimed that the medical professional "erroneously identified the patient as a female" during a briefing with Trump and Pence.

    Sourse: www.mirror.co.uk

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